This page is dedicated to information about bamboo that is currently being grown at the Bamboo Nut Company. We have a unique climate in South Texas. Harlingen is located in the beautiful Lower Rio Grande Valley. Harlingen is in a zone 10 according to the new American Horticultural Society & USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map issued in March of 2003 and the National Arbor Day Foundation Hardiness Zone map for 2006. For further information related to heat and the average number of days above 86 degrees F, check out the American Horticultural Society's Heat Zone map. Harlingen is in a heat zone 10 with an average of 150 - 180 days above 86F. To see all three maps with a Boonut locator, click here. Another very useful map is Sunset's Garden Climate Zones which goes a little deeper in terms of all climate factors including: length of growing season, timing and amount of rainfall, winter lows, summer highs, humidity. Harlingen is in a zone 27 according to this map. To learn more about agriculture in Harlingen, click here.

Click on the icon to listen to the pronunciation of the botanical name.  The pronunciation of each bamboo is based on several factors including research and "more people pronounced it that way".  Users of this site are welcome to offer opinion as to the correct pronunciation of any bamboo.  You can send me an email at aleshire@boonut.com  Thanks to everyone that helped with the pronunciation of these bamboo. 

fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes = Full Sun.  3_4sun.jpg - 885 Bytes = 3/4 Sun.  fullsshade.jpg - 619 Bytes =Full Shade.  Keep in mind this information is based on planting bamboo in deep South Texas.  As I learn more, I will update the information below.


Bamboo
Common
Name

Description
Max
Height
Max
Culm Dia.
Min.
Temp.
Bambusa sp. "Richard Waldron" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Richard Waldron This bamboo was introduced in Florida by a friend who has since passed away. Richard was a true bamboo authority and will be missed by many. No one has been able to identify this particular species and it is named in his memory. The bamboo is a very tight clumper. It is very erect with many small canes. This could be used for any type of screen or tight hedge. It is a very attractive addition to the bamboo world. Source: Chuck Theroux at Bountiful Earth.com 20 Feet .5 inches 20 F.
Bambusa Balcooa fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Balcooa Very thick walled clumping bamboo. This bamboo is very nice. Although the wood is very strong, it is very starchy and not recommended for long-term construction. This bamboo can be very dense and will get out of control if not thinned. Medium water needs. Source: Ed at Rivers End Nursery.com 60 Feet 6 inches 26 F.
Bambusa Bambos fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant Thorny This large clumping bamboo is used as both a wind break and impenetrable hedge. Extremely hard thick-walled culms and unique branches make this bamboo an eye catcher. Very fast grower. Culms start out green and quickly turn purplish black with full sun. This one is a real eye catcher if all branches lower than 6 feet are cut on a yearly basis and thinned to only 6 - 8 culms. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 100 Feet 7 inches 27 F.
Bambusa Beecheyana "pubescens" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Beechey Pubescens This bamboo is a little different than the typical Beecheyana in several respects. First, this one does not carry the Mosaic Potex virus... secondly, this one has leaves that feel a little harder... almost like a light plastic... third, there is more pubescens (short hairs) on the culms, and fourth the culm tips don't droop as much as the standard form. This one looks more like a bent fishing pole than a giant fountain. This bamboo seems to be more resistant to scale on the culms and leaves. Plant in full sun. Edible shoots in high demand. Low water needs Update (8/2010): After considerable rainfall this year, new culms are twice the size of the older culms. This one is quickly becoming one of my favorites. Source: Robert Saporito at Tropical Bamboo.com 50 Feet 5 inches 20 F.
Bambusa Chungii fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
White Bamboo/Tropical Blue This bamboo is not really white but looks absolutely gorgeous. Called white bamboo because the new shoots are covered in so much powder that it appears white. The culms are blue to a greenish color. A highly sought after and rather spectacular ornamental, it resembles bambusa textilis in habit. Thin walled, the canes are used traditionally for weaving. Medium water needs. Does better with regular soil amendments. Update 12/2005: this bamboo takes a while to get established in deep South Texas... possibly 2 years. After it gets established, this is a very nice boo. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 34 Feet 2 inches 21 F.
Bambusa Distegia fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown From Western China. Erect culms. Used for weaving and crafts. Very distinct leaves. The upper side of the leaves are smooth the bottom side feels like velvet. Mine has only 3/4" culms so far. It also has incredibly hairy culm sheaths. Update (8/2010): I was ready to give up on this one, but with lots of rain and fertilizer (primarily ammonium sulfate), it is doing much better. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 30 Feet 4 inches 25 F.
Bambusa Emeiensis ‘flavidorivens’ fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown Beautiful yellow culms with green stripes. Newer introduction. Gorgeous shoots. Very erect with medium sized leaves. I was looking for the best yellow bamboo with green stripes. I think this is it. Update (8/2010): Definitely one of my favorites. Maybe number 1. Source: Sherry Snodgress at BambooFlorida.com 35 Feet 2.5 inches 24 F.
Bambusa Emeiensis ‘viridiflavus’ fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown Beautiful green with broad yellow stripes on alternating internodes. Newer introduction. This one is sure to be a winner. Extremely vigirous grower. Source: Chuck Theroux at Bountiful Earth.com 35 Feet 2.5 inches 24 F.
Bambusa Eutuldoides "viridi vittata" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Asian Lemon This bamboo is fairly new to the U.S.. It is an absolutely gorgeous light yellow clumper with green stripes. The colors on this bamboo seem to be brighter than other yellow clumpers. The green stipes come in different sizes and variations of green. Asian Lemon is a producer of numerous culms. This one is truly unique because it can be grown in colder climates as compared to Bambusa Vulgaris "vittata" which is another well known yellow with green stripes bamboo. This one is susceptible to mealy bug damage... but, if you spray it with just about any systemic insecticide, it will be one of your best "lookers" for a smaller bamboo. Update 12/2005: I still can't believe how many culms this one produces. I started with four culms in one pot in May of this year and now have 7 pots with about 24 culms. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 35 Feet 2 inches 15 F.
Bambusa Heterostachya "Taiwan Variegated" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Taiwan Variegated Some have discribed this bamboo as a fluffy snowball. This variegated dense bamboo is very useful as an ornamental hedge that is easy to prune to a desired shape. Previously sold as Bambusa variegata. Update 12/2005: this one was easy to propagate from divisions, but the leaves continually look bad no matter what I do. Since I have only had this one less than a year, perhaps more time will yield better results. Update (8/2010): I no longer have this bamboo. Donated to someone that has more shade. Source: Chuck Theroux at Bountiful Earth.com 15 Feet 1 inche 30 F.
Bambusa Lako fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Timor Black Erect new green culms mature to shiny purple/black. Very nice green stripes. One of the most striking of the tropical bamboos. Propagation of this one by culm node suggests that timing is everything. I tried culm node propagation several times throughout the year with success in June on 1 - 2 year old culms. This is one of my top 3 favorites. It definitely grows well here... although it can be frozen back from time to time. In six months, you won't know it ever had freeze damage. Freezes here only happen every 3 - 5 years. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 70 Feet 4 inches 27 F.
Bambusa Luteostriata fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
South Kalimantan Native to Indonesia. Very nice ornamental clumping bamboo. New leaves have white stripes but these fade to dark green as the leaf matures. Culms have random cream stripes. Although this bamboo can grow in full sun, this species seems to be happier with a little shade. Keep moist. Material grown in containers will need daily watering if temperatures are warm. High water needs. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 25 Feet 2 inches 31 F.
Bambusa Malingensis fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Sea Breeze A tight, erect clumping bamboo known to tolerate sea breezes. The culms are very strong with fine grained durable wood. Internodes can be up to 17.5 inches. Excellent as a hedge as it puts up a large quantity of culms. Dark green culms and foliage. I saw a full grown specimen at Kanapaha Botanical Gardens in Florida. It looked very similar to Bambusa Ventricosa with the exception of not having the white bands above and below the nodes. Update (8/2010): this bamboo is perfect for our area. It requires the least maintenance to look good. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 40 Feet 2.5 inches 20 F.
Bambusa Membranacea fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown A strong growing bamboo with very straight culms forming loose clumps. I first saw this one at John Roger's place near Melbourne, Florida. Very nice large bamboo. Update (8/2010): This one has been renamed Dendrocalamus Membranaceus. Mine has started to put up only variegated culms. Very excited about this one and gave it a very nice place at the farm this year. One of my favorites. Source: Chuck Theroux at Bountiful Earth.com 70 Feet 4 inches 26 F.
Bambusa Mutabilis fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Emerald Bamboo Persistent blue-white bloom and long internodes. A favorite of Roy Rogers. Definitely a very nice "straight" bamboo. Source: Roy Rogers at Roy Rogers Bamboo 40 Feet 2.3 inches 18 F.
Bambusa Nana fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Nana This is a beautiful medium sized timber bamboo from Thailand. Very nice. NOT a multiplex. Very recent import. I will post more information as I grow it. Update (8/2010): This is a very nice bamboo, however, it was killed by hurricane Dolly. It put up many new culms and seemed to be a fantastic bamboo. I now have another one from Sherry and am growing it larger in a pot before planting it at the farm. Source: Sherry Snodgress at BambooFlorida.com 25 Feet 3.5 inches 26 F.
Bambusa Odashimae fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Odashimae I purchased this bamboo as Bambusa Oldhamii. As it grew, it became obvious that it was not. It looks very similar to Oldhamii and I am sure that is what caused the confusion. B. Odashimae has thicker culm walls and bows out slightly at the base before going straight. Some of the internodes at the base are compressed on this bamboo... a very distinguishing characteristic. This is a very nice bamboo that might work better if you are looking for a large bamboo for windy locations. 35 Feet 3 inches 22 F.
Bambusa Oldhamii fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant
Timber
The most common & widely grown giant bamboo in the southwestern U.S.. Good landscaping plant, it forms a clump of culms which in August-September grow straight & vertical with relatively short branches & relatively wide but long leaves. Rather easily trimmed as a standard or as a very high, dense hedge. Plant 7 - 8' on center for a tall hedge in a warm climate. Medium water needs. Update 12/2005: after several years of growing this one, I am changing the water needs to higher watering needs between July - December in South Texas. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 55 Feet 5 inches 18 F.
Bambusa Pervariabilis fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown Smaller version of Bambusa Tuldoides. Thick culm walls. Low water needs. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 35 Feet 2.5 inches 25 F.
Bambusa Textilis fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Weaver's Bamboo An extremely handsome tight clumping bamboo from China that arches gracefully at the tops of its culms. The thin walled culms, without branches on the lower half, provide for long straight culms of medium wall thickness that are used for weaving and furniture. All of the textilis varieties make excellent hedges/screens when planted in rows. There are many seedling varieties of textilis. Medium water needs. Source: Roy Rogers at Roy Rogers Bamboo 40 Feet 2 inches 13 F.
Bambusa Textilis "Albostriata" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Variegated Weaver's Bamboo Also called B.textilis albo-lineata. Random white vertical stripes on culms. The stripes become more distinct as the bamboo matures. Typical textilis growth habit and appearance but with the added bonus of the white pin-stripes. An interesting bamboo. Source: Robert Saporito at Tropical Bamboo.com 30 Feet 1 inches 15 F.
Bambusa Tuldoides fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Punting Pole This bamboo is a prolific producer of thick walled culms. Very common in South Texas normally used as a tall screen or wind break. This bamboo must be thinned on a regular basis to see it's true beauty. 55 Feet 2.5 inches 15 F.
Bambusa Ventricosa fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Buddha's Belly Buddha's Belly becomes a dwarf with swollen internodes when grown in pots under dry conditions. In the ground it reverts to a giant with zigzag culms and branches. Sometimes considered a separate species. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 55 Feet 2.5 inches 21 F.
Bambusa Ventricosa "Clone X" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Clone X Bambusa Ventricosa "Clone X" grows larger than the type in central Florida. A vigorous bamboo with extremely thick walls, ivory nodal bands, whitish bloom. Identification uncertain. Source: Roy Rogers at Roy Rogers Bamboo 75 Feet 2.8 inches 21 F.
Bambusa Ventricosa "Kimmei" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Striped Buddha's Belly This bamboo is similar to the Bambusa Tuldoides "ventricosa", but the culms are yellow with a few green stripes and the leaves and leaf blades have a few white stripes. If grown in a pot, it can have swollen internodes. In the ground, it will probably lose the swollen internodes. Update (8/2010): This one just needed ammonium sulfate and plenty of water to size up quickly and become one of my favorites. Source: Ed at Rivers End Nursery.com 55 Feet 2.5 inches 20 F.
Bambusa Vulgaris fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Common Bamboo This bamboo is common throughout the tropical world. It produces a very open clump with culms spaced up to a foot or two apart. Culm nodes root very easily. Open clump, culms spaced a foot or two apart. Culm cuttings root very easily. Used for banana props. 50 Feet 4 inches 29 F.
Bambusa Vulgaris "Vittata" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Painted Bamboo One of the most attractively marked culms - 4" diameter yellow culms marked with variable vertical green stripes. New culms shoot upward in September-October, a habit which makes the tender new growth especially susceptible to early or severe winter cold. Likes to have its roots kept moist or even wet, does not like to grow in a pot unless the pot is quite large - prefers a humid environment. In fact it is one of the most drought-sensitive bamboos and will let you know almost immediately by shriveling up its leaves a bit if it is thirsty. Bold, dramatic, highly ornamental specimen plant - used a lot in Hawaii by landscape architects & contractors because of the very attractive color & striping of its culms, markings are often said to resemble oriental brush painting. Source: Kinder Chambers (Central Texas) 50 Feet 4 inches 27 F.
Bambusa Vulgaris "Wamin" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant Buddha's Belly Dwarf bamboo with short and swollen lower internodes. Definitely a conversation starter. Source: Ed at Rivers End Nursery.com 16 Feet 3 inches 27 F.
Chusqea Coronalis fullsshade.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Costa Rican Weeping Bamboo This is considered the most beautiful bamboo in cultivation. With masses of graceful, feathery leaves it seems like a tropical version of the Japanese Maple. The branches on this bamboo completely cirle the culm node. This plant is semi-deciduous and for about 2 months out of the year – often in late winter or early spring – the foliage will turn “autumn” colors. Some of the old leaves will fall off and sometimes a few juvenile canes will die back. Excellent in containers. Seems to do best in the shade in South Texas. Does not like harsh wind or full sun. Update (8/2010): This one died. It did not like the heat of south Texas. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 16 Feet 3/4 inch 25 F.
Dendrocalamus sp. #69 fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown This bamboo was purchased from Hawaii. Pacific Tropical Gardens claims this is the largest bamboo in Hawaii. Several folks from Hawaii purchased seed labeled Dendrocalamus Giganteus. As the seed came up, it was obvious it was not D. Giganteus. It turned out to be a very, very large clumper. Not much is known other than that. As I find out more, I will post the information on this site. I have two to experiment with that are 5 feet tall. This one is also a jumper in that the culms are significantly larger each year. One of the characteristics of this bamboo is the fact that the branches go out perpendicular to the culm. Update 12/2005: This one has solid culms and may turn out to be related to Dendrocalamus Strictus. This bamboo needs a little more water than other strictus bamboo growing locally. Time will tell what this plant ends up as. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 80+ Feet 12 inches 26 F.
Dendrocalamus Asper fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Indonesian Asper This bamboo is supposed to grow a little larger than the "Thai" Dendrocalamus Asper. A large, beautiful clumper, grown for its edible shoots and construction grade culms. Of the large leafed bamboos, this tolerates drier conditions than most. Used extensively for house and furniture construction. Quick growing. Its enormous shoots are sweet and non-astringent. A great all-around bamboo. Update (8/2010): Not a good bamboo for South Texas unless you have shade. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 100 Feet 10 inches 28 F.
Dendrocalamus Asper "Betung Hitam" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Black Asper This is another giant clumper that is absolutely stunning. Black culms with occasional green stripes. Grown for edible shoots and construction grade culms. Very Rare. Update (8/2010): I thought this one was on its last legs with two hurricanes and a freeze in 2004 and another freeze in 2009, but with extra ammonium sulfate and lots of rain water this year, it put up new culms and seems to be rebounding very nicely. Source: Texas Bamboo Society Auction at Texas Bamboo Society.net 100 Feet 8 inches 26 F.
Dendrocalamus Brandisii fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Velvet leaf bamboo Majestic and statuesque clumper. A dramatic specimen in the landscape, it has erect silvery canes and dark green velvety leaves. The large edible shoots are amongst the most delectable, and the mature canes are timber quality. It has been claimed that it has grown to 120 feet, though 60 feet might be as realistic an expectation. It is extremely quick - a wonderful plant to watch grow. Update (8/2010): In full sun with little water, this one just doesn't grow much at all. Even fertlizer and rain don't help this one much. It needs shade. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 100 Feet 8 inches 30 F.
Dendrocalamus Brandisii "Black" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Black Brandisii Majestic and statuesque clumper. A dramatic specimen in the landscape, it has erect silvery "black" canes and dark green velvety leaves. The large edible shoots are amongst the most delectable, and the mature canes are timber quality. It has been claimed that it has grown to 120 feet, though 60 feet might be as realistic an expectation. It is extremely quick - a wonderful plant to watch grow. Update (8/2010): just planted this one at the farm. It was doing nicely in my back yard in a pot. Source: Sherry Snodgress at BambooFlorida.com 80 Feet 8 inches 30 F.
Dendrocalamus Calostachyus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Burmese Bamboo This is another giant clumper from Burma. In it's native habitat, it is used for the construction of small buildings and domestic purposes including water vessels. 80 Feet 6 inches 25 F.
Dendrocalamus Giganteus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant Bamboo This bamboo is one of the world's largest. Giganteus may be branchless up to 40 feet when full grown. The leaves can be up to 20 inches long and 4 inches wide. This is a preferred raw material for paper making. I have purchased about 8 different bamboo labeled Dendrocalamus Giganteus. Most look very different. In time, I will hopefully give some clarification as to the real "giganteus". Be very careful about purchasing this bamboo. There are MANY different types of bamboo being sold as D. Giganteus. MANY are definitely not D. Giganteus. 100 Feet 12 inches 25 F.
Dendrocalamus Giganteus "Variegated" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant Bamboo Similar to the Quail Clone of giganteus, but has variegated leaves. The culms also have a unique appearance in that the node rings are contorted at the base sometimes zigzagging back and forth. Update (8/2010): After some ammonium sulfate and plenty of rain, this one rewarded me with new shoots and seems to be taking off quickly in the ground. Very excited about this one. Source: Jim Rehor at RainForest Bamboos.com 100 Feet 12 inches 25 F.
Dendrocalamus Giganteus "Quail Clone" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant Bamboo This is supposed to be the real Dendrocalamus Giganteus. This one was propagated from the large specimen at Quail Botanical Gardens in California. The leaves are at least 19" long and just shy of 5" wide at only 6 foot tall. I received this plant in November of 2005. It was a very small culm node cutting about the size of a pencil. By July of 2006, it had already put up a shoot over 1" in diameter. The smaller culms about 1/2" in diameter already had the very large leaves although they were only about 6 foot tall. This year, it put up 6 new culms... and the year is not over. It is now the end of August and the 1" shoot hasn't stopped growing. I imagine it will be over 12 foot tall before it finishes growing. This is the bamboo I dreamed of and wanted from the first time I started doing research on "BIG BAMBOO" for my 21.43 acre farm. The bamboo labeled as Dendrocalamus Giganteus coming from Florida look very similar, but don't have the large leaves or straight culms. The culms on those bamboo are fairly rough to the touch and remind me more of a Dendrocalamus Asper... with fine pubescens on the culms. The culms from the Quail clone are smooth with lots of bloom (white powder). It is truly a beautiful bamboo. I don't know all the answers, and don't truly know if this is indeed the true giganteus, but I do know it grows very, very tall with exceptionally large leaves and comes closest to the descriptions. I believe this is the true Dendrocalamus Giganteus.

In time, I will be able to tell you how it does in terms of minimum temps for Deep South Texas and how it grows in our heat and humidity. For now, this is my favorite bamboo. I have two of these. Source: Jim Rehor at RainForest Bamboos.com and Robert Saporito at Tropical Bamboo.com
100 Feet 12 inches 25 F.
Dendrocalamus Grandis fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown Little is known about this bamboo. It has green culms with silky texture. The leaves feel a little like plastic. I will update as I learn more. Update (8/2010): This one went through the freeze of 2009 with no problems. With some ammonium sulfate and plenty of rain, this one is really looking nice. May be one of my favorites. Source: Jim Rehor at RainForest Bamboos.com 60 Feet 4 inches 24 F.
Dendrocalamus Hamiltonii fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Red-Shoot Bamboo Vigorous clumper with rust colored shoots. This bamboo looks like a larger Bambusa Oldhamii. I have two different types. One is grown from seed and one that was purchased. Update (8/2010): This one turned out to be just another D. Strictus. NOT hamiltonii. 80 Feet 7 inches 25 F.
Dendrocalamus Latiflorus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Taiwan Giant This bamboo has smooth light green shoots with medium green culms with very large leaves. A very attractive fast growing clumper. Sweet high quality edible shoots. Straight strong timber. If you want a large bamboo with very large leaves, then this is a must have. Mulch regularly and water during prolonged dry periods. This one is not infected with the Mosaic Potex Virus. Update (8/2010): This bamboo is doing nicely after a generous helping of ammonium sulfate and plenty of rain this year. I thought it would die as the other one did. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 80 Feet 8 inches 26 F.
Dendrocalamus Minor fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Ghost Bamboo Absolutely beautiful bamboo. Very large leaves. The culms are light green to yellow. This bamboo gets it's common name from the heavy bloom on the culms. This one looks like a large leaf Bambusa Chungii. One of my favorites. Update (8/2010): Don't know what it is about this one, but it does not like South Texas. May be the salt in the soil. I have lost two. Source: Jim Rehor at RainForest Bamboos.com 30 Feet 2 inches 24 F.
Dendrocalamus Minor "amoenus" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Ghost Bamboo Absolutely beautiful bamboo. Large leaves. The culms are light green to yellow with dark green stripes. This bamboo gets it's common name from the heavy bloom on the culms. I would highly recommend this one for South Texas. Source: Ed at Rivers End Nursery.com 30 Feet 2 inches 24 F.
Dendrocalamus Sinicus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Giant Bamboo This is the largest clumping bamboo in China. The node rings are covered with 3-4 mm long yellowish brown silky hair. Not much is known about this bamboo and it's growth habits in the United States. This bamboo could be referred to as a "jumper" since it can go from 1/2 inch culms one year up to 2 inch culms the second year. If you are going to experiment with this one, you will need plenty of water and space. Update (8/2010): I have had a few setbacks with this one and now have it planted in a more protected area. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 120 Feet 12+ inches 27 F.?
Dendrocalamus Strictus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Male Bamboo Drought resistant clumping bamboo that usually has solid culms that are very useful for garden tools. Fairly quick growing and has grey/green slightly furry to the touch leaves. Very graceful looking bamboo. Highly recommended if you are after a useful bamboo for around the home, farm or garden. Update (8/2010): This one is turning out to be one of the toughest bamboos around. I had a very large specimen that was uprooted by hurricane Dolly. It was uprooted for a number of months with no care. A friend wanted to save it and divided it up and planted it along his fence line and it is doing fantastic. This one does require a little trimming to look nice. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 70 Feet 6 inches 26 F.
Dendrocalamus Validus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown Orange shaded culm sheaths. This bamboo has convex nodes slightly tilted inward. I will publish more as it grows. Source: Robert Saporito at Tropical Bamboo.com 45 Feet 5 inches ? F.
Dendrocalamus Yunnanicus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Unknown This is another large bamboo with large leaves. This bamboo was grown from seed and is a new generation. The large culms nod at the top. From Yunnan, China, and North Vietnam. Used for construction. Update (8/2010): This one died. Did not like it here in South Texas. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 70 Feet 7 inches 28 F.
Drepanostachyum Khasianum fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Khasia The new culms are dark green covered with white powder which gives them a bluish look. Fairly small bamboo. Update (8/2010): This one died once I put it in the ground. It was planted at my house in the shade... but, I believe the heat was still too much for it. Source: Chuck Theroux at Bountiful Earth.com 12 Feet .5 inches 20 F.
Gigantochloa Apus fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Tabashir Bamboo Very straight strong culms are prized as construction material in Malaysia and Indonesia. Split culms are used for baskets and rope. The young culms are split and used for the framework of rattan furniture. Dark grey-green culms and large leaves. Forms tight clumps. Grow quickly and produces numerous culms each year. Large amounts of Tabashir, an important ingredient in many Chinese medicine, are found in the lower internodes. Reported to be resistant to borers. Although the shoots are edible they are bitter; they are buried in mud for several days before cooking. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 60 Feet 4 inches 28 F.
Gigantochloa Atter fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Atter A large, beautiful green bamboo. The atter is a very erect, tight clumper. It makes an impressive specimen plant or can be used to create a very large hedge. Source: Steve Carter at Caldwell Nursery.com 60 Feet 6 inches 28 F.
Gigantochloa Atroviolacea fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Tropical Black One of the most sought after bamboos. This striking black bamboo is a tight clumping, erect plant. The new canes come up green and then turn black. The gracefully drooping dark green leaves add to its exotic, tropical appearance. This one can be distinguished from Bambusa Lako by the texture and finish of the culms. Tropical Black has a matt finish while Bambusa Lako has a glossy finish. Tropical Black is a little more delicate than Bambusa Lako although both work well in South Texas. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 40 Feet 3 inches 27 F.
Gigantochloa Marga fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Tiger Stripe This is a new introduction to the United States. This bamboo gets its name from the new culm sheaths. They seem to be striped like a tiger. As I learn more about this bamboo, I will post it here. Source: Sherry Snodgress at BambooFlorida.com 20 Feet 1.5 inches 28 F.
Gigantochloa Pseudoarundinacea "maxima" fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Pseudoarundinacea Tall, very vertical and extremely statuesque, this plant sports large leaves and cream striped large diameter canes. Does better in drier conditions than the large Dendrocalamus’ and also, like most Gigantochloas, the quality of the wood is excellent and the shoots are edible. Source: Texas Bamboo Society Auction at Texas Bamboo Society.net 80 Feet 6 inches 28 F.
Gigantochloa Sumatra fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Sumatra A new introduction. Lavender stripes on the new culms. When mature, the stripes fade and some of the culms can turn a burnt orange color. Erect and neat. Update (8/2010): This one really likes it here, although it did die back after the freeze of 2009. It has recovered nicely and puts up many shoots. Could be in my top 5. Source: Robert Saporito at Tropical Bamboo.com 60 Feet 2.5 inches 28 F.
Gigantochloa Verticillata fullsun.jpg - 1121 Bytes
Verticillata This bamboo came from a reliable source and is currently a seedling. Although ABS now says this is the true Gigantochloa Pseudoarundinacea, I prefer to use F.A. McClures research "The Bamboos". McClure says this bamboo is highly variable. This bamboo should have green and yellow stiping on the lower culm internodes. The nodes are somewhat flared and fringed with hairs at the sheath scar. The lower nodes should have prominent verticil of roots or root primordial just above the sheath scar. G. Verticillata is one of McClure's "elite" species. As I learn more about G. Vertticillata, I will post the information here. Update (8/2010): I lost one of these that I planted at the farm. I am keeping the other in a 75 gallon pot. Culms have white stripes and it is a fairly small bamboo. I will eventually plant at the house or in a shady spot at the farm. It does better in shade. Very nice bamboo. Had no damage with the freeze of 2009... although it was in my back yard in a pot. Source: Jim Rehor at RainForest Bamboos.com 40 Feet 4 inches ? F.
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Moonlight A very rare form of Guadua that has blonde white culms with random varying width green stripes. The leaves have strong white variegated leaves. The white culms even retain the noted Guadua white rings around the culm node. This colorful giant has stunning color. Fantastic looking bamboo that needs shade. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com ? Feet ? inches ? F.
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Giant Thorny Native to South America where it is one of the best species for construction. The culms have short internodes. This bamboo is durable and rot and pest resistant. Beautiful large bamboo. Very large straight thorns. Source: Steve at Pacific Tropical Gardens.com 90 Feet 10 inches 28 F.
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Mexican Weeping The leaves on this bamboo look more like grass. This is a gorgeous bamboo with leaves so dense you can hardly see the culm. This is a must have for a truly unique look. Water sparingly. 20 Feet 1.5 inche 22 F.
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Mayan Silver This bamboo is very similar to Otatea Aztecorum with the exception of having silver looking culms. Very rare. Do NOT water very often or you will kill it. 20 Feet 1.5 inche 22 F.
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Hawaiian Giant This bamboo was originally discovered in Hawaii by Jim Parker. Although this bamboo is still unidentified, it closely resembles the true Dendrocalamus Hamiltonii as pictured in A Compendium of Chinese Bamboo published by China Forestry Publishing House. Several people have this bamboo including Chuck Theroux at Bountiful Earth and Ano Tarletz at Gaia Yoga Nursery in Hawaii. I have one from each source. More will be published about this bamboo as it grows in Florida and Texas. See the link above for more information or to purchase this bamboo. Update (8/2010): WOW... this one loves it here in full sun. Can't believe how many new shoots it is putting out. All are twice the size of last year's growth. Had no problems with the freeze of 2009, the two hurricanes, and flooding. In my top 3. 100 Feet 10 inche 25 F.
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Giant Gray Bamboo A striking ornamental running bamboo with a distinct groove above pairs of branches at mid-culm nodes. Shoots in spring. The culms are totally green, usually much larger than "Black bamboo." The distinctive looking culms are gray-blue or whitish green, rough to the touch with beautiful dense foliage of green leaves. The wood quality is excellent and can be used for construction. Used as handles for farming implements, edible shoots, construction, Chinese medicine (Tabasheer) and ornamental plantings. Medium water needs. (Culms can be yellow when grown in bright sunlight) After 4 years of growth, I would have to say that I would NOT recommend this one for South Texas. It is now 2 feet tall. 65 Feet 4.5 inches 0 F.
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Vivax Vivax has thin walls, which makes it easy to split for working with crafts. Shoots begin to emerge early mid season and have been found free from any unpleasant taste, even in the uncooked state. Phyllostachys vivax is a very beautiful bamboo with an abundance of large dark green leaves. Once it is known, it can easily be recognized at a distance by its elegant drooping foliage. This Phyllostachys is the quickest to attain large size. Update 4/10/2005 - I almost gave up on running bamboo in South Texas. I used soil sulfure along with Nitrogen granuals this year and "BAM" it finally started growing. Usually, the runners start out at 6 feet and get smaller each year. This one took about 4 years to put up anything larger than 2 feet. The shoots this year are coming up around 3/4" in diameter. 70 Feet 5 inches -5 F.
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Robert Young The culms and branches soon turn from sulfur green to banana yellow. Longitudinal green stripes of variable width mark many internodes. Looks and grows best when grown in a warm sunny place. This bamboo runs very little in cool summers. In hotter summer areas the banana yellow color is replaced with bright orange and it spreads rapidly. Died in South Texas. 40 Feet 3 inches 0 F.
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Solidstem Solidstem is a small rare bamboo which grows to about 20 feet in height. The lower one half or more of the culm is solid. Solidstem makes fine hedges and screens with its masses of bright leaves. Good in pots and planters. This species has air canals in the rhizomes and roots which are an adaptation for growing in wet soils. It begins shooting in March - April. The shoots are among those having the least bite when raw. Died in South Texas. 20 Feet 3/4 inches 4 F.
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Sacred Bali Bamboo Striking beautiful butterscotch yellow clumper with green stripes. This ones flowers regularly without dying. The large leaves have occasional cream stripes. Thin walled culms are used for crafts and splits are used for traditional roofing. It is also used as containers for water and cooking glutinous rice. In Bali it is sacred and used in cremation ceremonies. This very useful bamboo is also often planted as an ornamental in SE Asia. Update (8/2010): Did great with the freeze of 2009 with die back about half of the culm height, but has recovered very nicely and has put up a number of new shoots. Very, very nice bamboo. It is doing even better in the ground. Source: John Nelson at Bamboo Texas.com 45 feet 3 inches 28 F.
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N/A Attractive erect bamboo with tiered branches make this a stately bamboo. Poor wood quality. Uniquely flavored shoots. Good for windbreaks or use along the coast. Unlike Fastuosa, "viridis" culms remain green rather than turning from green to purplish brown over time. Culm internodes with branches at their base are narrowly grooved above the branches. Stays about 2 feet tall in South Texas. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 35 Feet 1.5 inches -5 F.
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N/A Here is another very hardy Semiarundinaria. This bamboo has wide leaves that are very attractively arranged. It makes a good screen that spreads tenaciously and the canes are very flexible. Previously known as Semiarundinaria villosa. Stays about 2 feet tall in South Texas. Source: James Bonner at Bamboo Plantation.com 25 Feet 1.5 inches 0 F.